5 Reasons to Drink Coffee Before Your Workout

5 Reasons to Drink Coffee Before Your Workout
Nix caffeine at least six hours before bed to prevent sleep interference, and listen to your body. Keep drinking good old H 2 O your main beverage of choice. The next day, both groups were asked to remember the images, and the caffeinated group scored significantly better. And if you exercise, caffeine can offer even more functional benefits for your workouts. Keep drinking good old H 2 O your main beverage of choice.

5 Reasons to Drink Coffee Before Your Workout

This brain boost may be a real boon during workouts, especially when they entail needing to recall specific exercises or routines. In an animal study, sports scientists at Coventry University found that caffeine helped offset the loss of muscle strength that occurs with aging. The protective effects were seen in both the diaphragm, the primary muscle used for breathing, as well as skeletal muscle. The results indicate that in moderation, caffeine may help preserve overall fitness and reduce the risk of age-related injuries.

A recent study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology found that a little caffeine post-exercise may also be beneficial, particularly for endurance athletes who perform day after day. Incorporate it in healthy ways: Be consistent with your intake. Research shows that when your caffeine intake is steady, your body adjusts, which counters dehydration , even though caffeine is a natural diuretic.

Keep drinking good old H 2 O your main beverage of choice. Nix caffeine at least six hours before bed to prevent sleep interference, and listen to your body. Perhaps it's too little sleep, overexercising, or an inadequate diet. Researchers gave people who did not regularly consume caffeine either a placebo, or mg of caffeine five minutes after studying a series of images.

The next day, both groups were asked to remember the images, and the caffeinated group scored significantly better. This brain boost may be a real boon during workouts, especially when they entail needing to recall specific exercises or routines.

In an animal study, sports scientists at Coventry University found that caffeine helped offset the loss of muscle strength that occurs with aging. The protective effects were seen in both the diaphragm, the primary muscle used for breathing, as well as skeletal muscle.

The results indicate that in moderation, caffeine may help preserve overall fitness and reduce the risk of age-related injuries. A recent study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology found that a little caffeine post-exercise may also be beneficial, particularly for endurance athletes who perform day after day.

Incorporate it in healthy ways: Be consistent with your intake. Research shows that when your caffeine intake is steady, your body adjusts, which counters dehydration , even though caffeine is a natural diuretic. Keep drinking good old H 2 O your main beverage of choice.